Havanese - Generally do well with people with allergies

Wikipedia - Havanese

The Havanese is a breed of dog of the Bichon type, which do not shed. These dogs were developed from the now extinct Bichon Tenerife, which was introduced to the Canary Islands by the Spanish and later to other islands and colonies of Spain by sailors. They are very playful dogs and good with older, more considerate children.

Dogs for Allergy Suffers - brings you lots of pictures of the various dogs to help you in your search for your next puppy.
Select dog type from list on the right. Sometimes it helps to just see what the dogs look like. (Note: Flickr Photo Search may return pictures that are not of the requested dog type)

Hypoallergenic dog breeds

Dogs considered good for allergy suffers. Hypoallergenic dog breeds are dog breeds (or crossbreeds) that are alleged to be safer for allergic persons than other breeds, although a New York Times article finds that allergists believe that "all the safe-breed theories are just wishful thinking".[1] Allergists do recognize that at times a particular allergy patient will be able to tolerate a particular dog, but they agree that "the luck of the few with their pets cannot be stretched to fit all allergic people and entire breeds of dogs."[1]
The significant allergen for most people is a protein found in the dog's saliva and dander, produced by the sebaceous glands.[2] "Even if you get a hairless dog, it's still going to produce the allergen," Dr. Wanda Phipatanakul, chair of the Indoor Allergen Committee for the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology is quoted in the newsmagazine U.S. News & World Report as saying.[3]
The belief that some dog breeds are hypoallergenic is based in the idea that they secrete fewer irritating allergens than many other breeds, although there is no reputable scientific evidence to support the idea. Breeds that shed less are also believed to be hypoallergenic, since it is believed that the dog's dander and saliva stick to the hair and are not released into the environment; but this has never been proved.
If a person is only mildly allergic, they may be able to tolerate a specific dog, possibly of one of the allegedly hypoallergenic breeds. Dr. Thomas A. Platts-Mills, head of the Asthma and Allergic Disease Center at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, explained that there are cases in which a specific dog (not breed) might be better tolerated by a specific person, for unknown reasons. "We think there really are differences in protein production between dogs that may help one patient and not another," Dr. Platts-Mills said.[1]
Frequent cleaning and vacuuming of the home, using air filters, restricting the dog to certain rooms, and adopting a small dog that can easily be given frequent baths are all recommended to control allergens.[4]